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taxes and pay cuts, instead what they did was they taxed bank deposits. they're calling it a tax. a lot of folks are calling it a seizure. here's what's significant. even small depositors below the insurance threshold are going to get hit. the original number for small depositors below 100,000 euros was 6.5%. they're working in parliament right now about shifting that and any other subsequent plan suggests that if you have insured money it will still get hit. what did we see over the week whend this announcement happened on yesterday? runs on the atms at the banks in cypress because they'd shut down the banks as a result of this. they stopped all wire transfers and you also if you tried to take money out they had partitioned out the amount of money that you were supposed to be giveing to the government each though there hasn't been a vote in parliament. why did cypress need a bailout? its banks are bust. the reason the banks in sicypru they bet the greek debt would not be restructured but it was. that's left a lot of them insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of
now, speaking of cyprus, the idea of confiscating people's income after already been taxed sent a chill far beyond cypress. could that happen here? that is question we ask steve forbes, fox chairman and editor-in-chief. he has thoughts on that you don't want to miss coming up on the "countdown to the closing bell" -- "after the bell" [ male announcer ] at his current pace, bob will retire when he's 153, which would be fine if bob were a vampire. but he's not. ♪ he's an architect with two kids and a mortgage. luckily, he found someone who gave him a fresh perspective on hisortfolio. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. ♪
because of that deposit tax component. now, the president is currently meeting with the leaders of the political parties. of course, what he's trying to do is to strong arm and to persuade them into voting for that deal because the other alternative, yes, that is bankruptcy for this country, which has only 1 million people and only makes up 0.2% of the entire eurozone. the debate and the vote on that bailout deal will be kicking off in around four hours from now at 4:00 p.m. local time. thou, a lot of uncertainty as to what the outcome of the vote will be, given that nobody has a clear majority. having said that, there is, of course, the chance that some of the lawmakers who have been wavering could have been appeased by the talk that some of the taxes for the smallest depositors could be lowered. now, "the wall street journal" has reported that those deposits between zero is and 100,000 euros could be taxed at only 3% as opposed to 6.75% previously. now, the middle bracket would be 100,000 to 500,000 euros. that could be taxed at 10% and then anything in excess of half a millio
is not just a tax haven for russia, it is the tax haven for russian millionaires and billionaires. russia has invested $119 billion, that's with a "brks" in cyprus in 2011 alone. that's by far the largest recipient of russian investments in the world. equal amount of investment came back to russia from cyprus. funny how that works. russian investment is five times the total economic output for cyprus. russians account for $20 billion of total bank deposits or, tyler, as you mentioned, more than a third among the top russians in cyprus is the fert cider magnet now the biggest shareholder in the bank of cyprus. he has a lot of money in u.s. real estate as well. he brought donald trump's mansion and his daughter bout an apartment in sandy well. and alexander bought avraz steel. the mystery to me is why these wealthy russians kept so much money in cyprus when they knew the banks were in trouble. one reason is that there are fewer choices. if you look around the world, governments arie cracking down n tax evasion and money laundering. they're all complying with global capitalist. even with this 10
a silicon valley insider and former yahoo coo daniel rosenzweig on the push for the sales tax. what impact will that have on retailers? you'll want to hear his answer this morning and first, why dollar general can make some sense for your portfolio and take one more look at futures this morning. looking at a pretty decent open for a short workweek this day as we have good friday off here. live from squawk on the street from post 9 when we return. your big picture. but e with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> shares of dollar general rising in pre-market tradex clueding items that yrms 97 cents a share, beating wall street forecasts and revenues essentially in line with the company benefiting from increased food sales and jimmy,
are always trying to protect taxes or wealthy people? is that a problem out there with the rank-and-file voters? >> no, i mean -- i don't think so. i think that's obviously a misperception that's become a real perception by the public. but i think we have to talk about things in ways that people can relate to. i mean, if you're talking about taxes and taxing small businesses, you have to talk about the fact that if -- if -- if our small businessman has to pay more money to the government, then he's going to have less money to pay to his ememployers, and the ememployers will have less money to send kids to the school of their choice. i think it's a matter of talking about the debt differently. not just we are in imminent danger in a debt crisis in this country. but what does that mean to people? it means that our government is growing so fast and it's becoming so expensive that we're making payments to our credit cards that we can't afford, which means we have to keep -- we'll keep having this debate about needing more revenue to the government. well, that means less money in peo
meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignant they weren't brought into talks. let's hear what he had to say earlier on about the state of the current talks. >> first meeting very constructive. very honest discussion. we underscored how difficult the situation is and we'll now continue our discussions to find a solution by which we hope we will get some support from russia. >> in terms of that support, are we talking about a change of terms for the current existing 2.5 billion euro loan and an extension of 5 billion loan in addition to that? >
and the latest deposit tax scheme. happy anniversary, apple dividend and it was a year ago when the tech giant announced its dividend in 17 years. will apple succumb to the bigger payout as it faces stiffer competition from samsung. lululemon doing the downward facing dog with the transparency with the iconic black yoga pants prompting the retailer to cut sales guidance and boeing clinches an order from ryanair. of course, we begin with the markets. the dow and the s&p 500 hoping to avoid their first three-day losing streak of the year. wall street will be paying close attention in about three hours from now. that country's parliament scheduled to vote on a proposed tax on bank deposits and the controversial measure appears set to go down in defeat. here in the u.s., policymakers begin a two-day meeting in which they're expected to hold current policy. this is one of the meetings where we will get a press conference and people will be hanging on every word and every use of every adjective coming out of the fed chairman's mouth. are you expecting anything? >> i think that, frankly, we are looki
? >> this is a miss for new york governor andrew cuomo who wants to extend the temporary tax increase on high income earners in the state after promising to let it expire. for the second time extending that temporary tax increase. do you think voters would learn after a while they're being played here? apparently not. out in california governor jerry brown sold californians on a temporary tax increase for high income earners in his state. i guess the blue state liberals never learn. >> paul: bret? >> briefly a hit for pope francis off to a fantastic start and i think this is obviously true for catholics and even as a non-catholic you see a pope getting out and mingling with people and showing love and humility to the people assemblying by the hundreds of thousands in rome to see him. next week, he's going to go and wash the feet of inmates in a prison for young offenders and this is the right way it seems to me to conduct the papacy and wish him continued success. >> paul: thank you all. and remember, if you have your own hit or miss, send it to us at jer@foxnews.com and follow us on twitter: @jer o
going to go back to the original plan of taxing deposits. i am toll that's not going to be submitted to the troika. that may be the pipe dream of some in parliament. ladies and gentlemen, back to you. >> thanks, michelle. i was looking at the european bourses and i mean, if they can't sell off on this, and it's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some
spent it all. >> jesse: only 30 million. >> clayton: and now talk about what the taxes look on all of this. can i play the opposite side. you win million, 25% of that lump tum gone to the federal government and 84 information gone to, 0 gone to the federal governme government. >> alisyn: and then new jersey has a high state tax as you can see, 10.8%, so 36 1/2 million will go to new jersey, i know you're thinking, can i move today to texas? and i know you shall the winner are listening and kudos for your ingenuity. yes, you might be able to move to a state with no state tax, but new jersey might still take it. >> jesse: and if chris christie has its way, going to get more of your dough because i think the 7.8 to 9.8, good luck. >> clayton: hallelujah. still taking home 216 million dollars. that's what he would get it end. >> jesse: what would you do with that kind of dough. >> alisyn: let's talk about that. >> clayton: i don't know. >> jesse: would you buy me a boat. >> clayton: i would buy you a boat first. i don't know helping starving children i would help jesse get a boat. >> j
to affects our banking system. they had that choice. either that country defaults or they tax the banks and it is the russian money that is in there. >> let's say you have money in the caymen islands. >> oh, i do, greg. >> you probably do. and then all of a sudden the caymen islands decides they will take your money. isn't that an act of war? >> are you a dope for doing it. qaddafi did that. all of those people had the money. the libyan banks and qaddafi and your choice is to poke them in the chest and say give it back and he said no. that's the risk you take. you save on taxes and you put it in other countries, the risk is they will take your money. >> something out of this story that can anger people. given what happened in greece and cypress couldn't this happen to us in america? >> this could not happen to us in america. the idea it is russian money isn't true. it is a higher rate for those over100,000 euros. they are putting like 50,000 euros in cypress. the whole thing is enraging especially because the first story of i -- the first story i read,. >> i mean, my argument is it can
taxes on the wealthy, put through a payroll tax increase, entitlements. we've got two out of three going. we had the president and congress raising taxes on the wealthy. i don't think bernanke wants to be the fed of 1937 because the recession came back aggressively and it was only world war ii that made the hiring come back. he doesn't want to be the guy -- he'd rather be second-guessed by all the bears who come on and say he's got to tighten because my short positions aren't making any money. he's not responding to the people who are short. he's actually responding to the american people. old-fashioned kind of guy. >> in terms of the reaction in the markets after the ben bernanke news conference, was that surprising at all that, for whatever reason, for whatever he said, the markets managed to rise and actually reached the highs of the day afterwards? >> i think there were a lot of people who expected that he would put in some language that just says, we're not going to keep rates low indefinitely because we see real estate, affordability is fantastic. you pick up the front page of the
a one-time tax on bank accounts. why investors are around the world including the united states are growing more concerned about what is happening in cyprus. >> we're following a developing story in nevada where a military training exercise has ended in tragedy. the marine corps says seven marines were killed in an explosion. authorities investigating the exact cause which could include a related traffic accident. >> all this happening at hawthorne army depot in western nevada, 140 miles southeast of reno. helicopters brought in to take those patients to area hospitals. >>> at least 48 people today were killed in a wave of deadly attacks across iraq. >> in all, 17, yes, 17 car bombs, 7 roadside bombs and 2 shootings, this all coming of course on the tenth anniversary of the u.s.-led invasion of iraq. >> a live report from baghdad at the bottom of the hour. ♪ >> the trumpets sounding in the vatican, today marks the official start of pope francis' papacy. >> thousands of people, francis was inaugurated. the bishop of rome. >> francis cruise through st. peters square, in an open
in our currency. as part of the deal, this is the key. the local government raising taxes and puttings levies on some bank deposits. greg palkot is live outside parliament in the capitol of cyprus with more. greg? >> reporter: hey, jenna, the folks in cyprus right now are breathing a sigh of relief. they have avoided going under but at a cost. the deal struck with the european union was a tough one. probably why we saw protests here every day we've been here. one big bank will be shut down of the that will cost jobs. money from accounts of big uninsured depositers will be seized to the tune of 30% or more. small depositers will be spared but the little guys will suffer another way. the economy here is set to slow down. here is what we felt out on the streets of nicosia hire today. you might get some cash out of atm. in cyprus and there might be a bailout in place but in fact it is a holiday in this country. we talked to the folks here and their mood is definitelily not sunny. old money. you think that is better than the new money, the euros because of what happened? >> yes. because, be
, and lower taxes on the rich. >> give support to what is happening. >> reward those individuals creating jobs and that's what the republican budget does. >> i'm proud to support both the republican study committee budget and the house republican budget. >> it's amazing. these are the very same ideas that voters rejected in the election. tomorrow, republicans are expected to vote for the ryan budget overwhelmingly and that has some democrats licking their chops. "the hill" reports that the democrats are ready to slam gop on the ryan budget putting this out on tut this ad before the 2 election. so go ahead, republicans, vote for that ryan budget. the american people are going to have a very different vote for you very soon. joining me now is congressman -- democratic congressman grayson and cynthia tucker. >> good to be here, reverend. >> it might be the worst one yet. how do you explain these republicans in the house? >> it's bad for seniors, bad for children, and it's bad for everyone, even white guys. it raises the debt by $6 trillion. that's $20,000 for every man, women, and child in this c
on a positive note when something like bank deposits will be taxed as a way to raise money. they don't understand why investors here like you and me aren't more worried that the authorities there are willing to risk bank runs in spain or italy because of this hair-brain scheme. at this stage they would gladly pay for rioters in the streets of cyprus if we can get the media to accentuate today and link cyprus to the rest of europe and the united states, even if the european authority recognize that is the issue is that banks are safe havens for russian laundered money! the short sellers, they would at least pay cash for the numbers to line up. once they get some runs going leads me to the simple conclusion that intellectually short-sellers will do the best to say whatever resolution is arrived at or not arrived at, we have got the dreaded are you ready scheme daddy lehman brothers on our hands! wow. yes, they are envoking lehman. that's what they're doing. why lehman brothers? because you know what? lehman is code for thermal nuclear financial war. it was the line drawn in the sand be
tax on the large depositors which would lead to a tax of around 15% or 16%. or they can basically restructure their two bad banks. it would be very simple to do that. what would happen is the banks would write off all their equity, write-off their senior debt, write-off their dpovt subordinated debt. and then the large depositors would president owners of the new bank and convert. >> narrator: between 50% and 30% of their new depositors in the banks. >> could they say we don't want to do anything of those? >> certainly they can choose to do that. i don't think that's necessary. basically, if they do nothing, and the ecb carries through with its policy of cutting off liquidity on monday, they will have no choice but to restructure the two banks. >> are you surprised to see lines forming? >> no. depositors are frightened for their money. they've been told there's a high likelihood of the banks closing and staying closed for a period of time. in fact, the lines are not as long as i would have expected them. >> wow. interesting 30i7b9. i had a discussion with simon hobbs, my colleague
, which is to tax depositors below 100,000 euros. exactly one week later, that idea is completely dead. it's not going to happen. however, if you have uninsured deposits, over 100,000 euros in either one of the two banks that are going to be restructured, you are going to suffer severe losses, anywhere between 30% and 70% depending on which bank. equity goes to zero. junior bondholders to zee he row. senior bondholders for the most part to zero depends on the bank. what's the impact for investors? if you are an investor in european banks, you are on notice. every single bailout that has happened, your protection has diminished step by step by step. this is by design. it is europe's stated goal that by 2018 bailouts will not be a burden of the taxpayer. they will be born by the private sector and the investors in the questionable institutions. these banks will likely see interest rates rise as a result of this, maybe the countries that they're in. the question is, is this going to cause broader risk or force discipline and responsibility or both? >> additionally, european decision making on
to collect sales tax from all out of state internet retailers will take place in the senate today. inevitably, it has a lot of support from the big box retailers in particular. let's bring in john harwood who is live from d.c. though this may just be a symbolic vote, weir to are told john. >> symbolic, but not meaningl s meaningless. it's a spring training of sorts to test opinion within congress on various causes. we saw a vote yesterday on the budget resolution, on the repeal of a medical device tax that was included to help finance the national health care law in the early part of the obama administration. the reason it's spring training is that budget resolutions themselves are not lost. so these are not binding votes, but they're a way to test sent ims for what they make later on and that's what we're seeing on the online sales tax situation. 48 states already have laws on the books requiring online retailers to collect state sales tax, but those laws are often ignored and you have a bill that has some bipartisan support that would require all states to collect those taxes. if split, th
about cyprus and the atm bank lines and the tax scheme where they essentially bang the depositors for money. they violated the sacrosanct compact, i told him, that was meant to protect those deposits. stewart's all about common sense. he didn't think all of that much about the cyprus story. more importantly, he was hoping we wouldn't make too of it on this show because it would blow over since cyprus was a special case that couldn't easily be extrapolated and maybe even rally a little. then i went home after having some breakfast and i set out to study the charts and more on this later and settled in for serious ncaa bracketology while watching the canes play the tar heels. i tried to stay focused on march madness but i began to get bombarded by emails from bears worldwide -- [ shots fired ] brown bears, kodiaks, even koalas, telling me, this is it, jim, this is the big kahuna that i was being way too glib about the confiscation scheme that would rock my world. i knew not to dismiss the darn cyprus situation. i actually bothered to argue back, silly me. first i offered the standar
>> washington raised income taxes on the wealthy. >> boo! >> took the top marginal rate to the astounding 75% and instituted a 2% payroll tax for social security. their goal? they wanted to start trying to balance the budget because the president and treasury secretary were worried about the long term deficit? does that sound familiar? at the exact same time, the fed tightened rates, doing what all the bears say bernanke should do, betting that inflation could rage and rage easily if the fed stayed easy, which is what his critics are saying he should do right now. but when we went down this road in 1937 it sent the economy into an amazing tail spin. causing a recession within a depression. it was an economic calamity that was totally avoidable if the people in power made different, smarter choices. especially the federal reserve. ben bernanke does not want history to repeat itself. he's not going down the path of what the fed did in 1937. he's not stupid. even though that's exactly the path unfortunately that the president and congress are taking. bernanke recognizes that obama and congress
allows pinnacle to usist losses to cancel out the taxes they might owe for profits down the road. the corporate income tax bill will be tiny and nonexistent for years to come. there is another reason they get a higher valuation and that's growth. b&g has been growing sales consistently while pinnacle sales have been flat. the valuation disparity with b&g, let's say pinnacle deserves to trade 1.5 times sale. still a big discount to b&g. it would make this a $30 stock which is 50% higher than the high end of pinnacle's price range. i think $30 is a reasonable tashgt. especially since they are making smart moves. they are cutting costs. management is doing a terrific job. they made a conference call acting like they were a public company. the environment seems to be improving. pinnacle can do another acquisition. the company is paying you to wait to get their house in order with that great dividend. let's not forget, last week ken powell was on the show, he told us food inflation has peaked and competition is less fierce? that could help. pinnacle foods reminds me of long-time "mad
the house republican, paul ryan, budget plan. >> hand out more budget-busting tax breaks for the wealthy, and to pay for these wasteful tax breaks, ld -- it would end medicare guarantee, it would raise tax on middle class families. to appease the tea party, the ryan republican budget would risk recovery, and that's just a price too high. >> reporter: needless to say, republicans disagree. they believe that their budget which ultimately, they say, would balance, would provide more opportunity and more jobs for the american people, jon. jon: obviously, both sides trying to get their points out. what are the republicans saying about these budgetary matters? >> reporter: they're going after the budget that was proposed by senate budget chair patty murray. they say it increases spending, increases the debt, never balances and raises taxes. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell a few moments ago called it extreme. >> a party that once cared about hard working american families seems of to have gone off the leftmost edge of the reservation with this budget. d.c. democrats' priorities are jus
is it that allowed or condoned or suggested the idea that the lower threshold of 100,000 euros should be taxed? >> listen to the statement out of the european commission. one of the myriad of bureaucrats in brussels. the commission made it clear in the euro group meeting before and they capitalized before, the vote in the cypriot government that an alternative solution would be acceptable and preferably one without a levy on deposits below 100,000. the cypriots did not accept such an alternative scenario and they squarely placed the blame on the guys in the parliament building behind me. so we'll see what happens. the breaking point is at some point we're not going to keep stuffing the atms with money. and they'll have to figure it out and close down some banks, et cetera. >> i respect the detail that you've been through, but this market clearly believes that the deal will get done and the banks will get propped up with international aid. we're up 72 points on the dow. nobody in the market appears to be worried about it and we haven't seen a big move on bonds today. how do you reconcile that w
, the largely party line vote was 50-49, it followed a marathon overnight session, it would increase taxes by $1 trillion over the next decade and goes to the republican dominated house where it's not expected to survive. the senate has already voted down the house's plan. >>> in georgia a 14-year-old and 17-year-old are in custody expected to be charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of a 13-month-old boy. the baby's mother was pushing the little guy in a stroller thursday morning when two men approached her and demanded money. >> they're still looking for the gun and the motive. nick valencia is in the small town of brunswick in southeast georgia. nick you've gotten new information from police, what is that? >> reporter: good morning, victor. i just got off the phone with brunswick police officer todd rhodes and says the two suspects have officially been charged with first-degree murder and also tells me in response to this alleged alibi from demarcus elkins, the older suspect, now his aunt was saying that he was with her that night, that it's impossible that they got the wrong
is actually taxing everybody's bank accounts. >> if you look at the size of cyprus, it has an economy about the size of vermont. but, what it underscores is the fact that years on into the european debt crisis, there's still no common way to resolve a country that's going into sovereign collapse, to get a banking system out of bankruptcy. europeans don't know what will happen. as you said, the first proposition in cyprus, would have included a one-time tax, essentially taking depositors' money. they could lose their money. that's presumably off the table. it looks like the cypriots will be trying to hit the offshore money. bottom line is, if you live in another beleaguered country like spain or italy, you might be thinking of going to bank and take your money out. >> and just the fact that eu was floating this idea and the authorities in cyprus were floating this idea means, this is the beginning of the end of the euro, people have no confidence they can deposit their funds in the bank creates insecurity. >> real quickly, another deadline tonight for a possible agreement, do you think we'll
it by reducing and taking away child benefits, which was universal tax credit that was given to all mothers. they did that five months ago. now yesterday they announced that they were going to give credit to parents who were going out to work, but they weren't actually going to bring it into place until 2015 until the next government's in place. so we've got a long way to go until it actually happens. >> there was an interesting survey here in the united states salary.com, i'll give you the stats, they said that mothers spend about 94 hours a week working on their parental duties. this is no real surprise i suppose if you've got kids. things like child care, cooking and cleaning. if they were to get paid for those duties with today's sort of average salary rankings, it comes out to $112,000 a year you'd be paying them. so you generally think stay at home moms aren't respected in great britain or generally speaking within the community? >> no, they're not respected. women visible in country and there are only two countries in the whole world that don't recognize a family, that means a couple
that they would have to tax the bank accounts of their own citizens and those of foreigners in their country to help pay back this loan to bail them out. they don't like the idea of that at all. who's pushing it? we don't know where it came from, but we know a very strong eurozone member, germany, has been talking a lot about accountability. the idea that if you have a bailout like this for cyprus there has to be some really strong participation from cyprus in paying it back. and maybe there's no other way for them to pay back. that is what has spurred so much talk about russia of all things. why russia? why would russia be so interested in all this? there's a historic connection between russia and cyprus, but importantly many, many russians have many, many millions of dollars in those cyprus banks as an offshore tax haven. enough so they may control half of the accounts there in cyprus. the russian government does not want that money lost to its citizens for investment in russia, for building in russia. so the idea has been floated that maybe russia will step in and find a way to help pay b
were concerned about the impact of gasoline prices and the increase in the payroll tax for us, but consumers are still spending money. important because that makes up about 70% of america's economic growth. and if you're looking for something new to buy, samsung will be happy to oblige. introducing its new galaxy 4 smartphone this week. the phone features a five-inch screen, a larger battery and a screen you don't have to touch, but just hover your fingers over. samsung is apple's main competition in the smartphone market. >>> well, the markets setting new records almost every day, and the federal reserve meeting next week, what could happen next and what should you do with your money? joining me right now to talk than, randy kroszner is the former federal reserve governor and current professor at the university of chicago booth school of business. and jim mcaughan is ceo of principle global investors with $280 billion in assets under gentlemen, it's good to have you on the program. thank you so much for joining us. >> sure. >> so many stories to talk about. jim, every time th
3.9% yield? a heck of a lot better than treasuries after the tax benefits. it's been left behind by the rest of its cohort. i can't believe i'm talking about this one because it's so far behind. i'm talking about one of the great american companies, merck, mrk, the pharmaceuticals giant that's stumbled more times in the last few months than a college kid on st. paddy's day. since early december, the early pharma names have roared. pfizer up 12%, bristol miers up. i'm typical of my eighth anniversary, i somehow got blue ink on my hand. and cell gene jumped 43%. meanwhile, merck has done nothing. it's actually down about 1% over the same period. right now there are reasons merck has underperformed the rest of the ones. in december, the good -- in december, the company got bad clinical trials from a new cholesterol drug that they were working on. and i thought it was going to be a big one, i have to tell you. so merck decided to stop development here in the u.s. and pull the drug overseas where it was already approved. this was one that i thought was just going to be the blockbuster
it was insufficient. >> reporter: but the guard had trouble reporting how the tax dollars was somehow not presented to general baldwin until after our investigations. >> you found some serious problems? >> yes. >> and from all indications, nothing significant changed? >> yeah. >> frustrated? >> i'm sure they are. >> reporter: so that report, was it a waste of taxpayer money? >> i would say that at the end of the day, had it come to a conclusion, it would have been money well spent. the fact that it was not followed up on but the national guard bureau in the first year. that is a problem. >> reporter: but it is important to note that the petty report criticizes the california national guard's failure to handle complaints. during wednesday's hearing at the capitol, the national guard said it recently provided additional training and the california national guard is in compliance. >> of the big messages we continue to reform the california national guard and the california military department, the governor appointed me to make change, and we have made substantial change. >> reporter: general baldwin s
on the benefits of taxes insurance and health insurance. there are arguments in two cases that could change all of that, and believe it or not hundreds of major corporations are telling the justices to make gay marriage legal. we all know how the justices feel about corporations. joining me now in the san francisco war room is jim lazarus, the southbound of the public policy, a business organization which has been ahead of the curve when it comes to supporting guy marriage. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> michael: it's our pleasure. this is a very important story that i'm glad we're covering. 200 counties have signed legal briefs to turn over prop 8 and the defense i have marriage act which both ban gay marriage. your organization was among them. why is this issue so important in the corporate world? >> diversity of your workforce. especially in san francisco but you're seeing it in california and all around the country. when you have 10% to 20% of your workforce that is identified as gay or lesbian, it's a big part of your ability to attract and retain. we brought this at the request o
of the states where it is legal, they cannot file joint tax return, and they can't get social security survivor's benefits and if the court upholds doe m s doma all is overturn and if it is overturned then the federal government will have to treat married people like married people. >> does it line up in the court that way as well? >> well, this is always a difficult question is what effect does public opinion have on the justices. the official answer is none. they apply the constitution, and the real world answer is plenty. there are five republicans and four democrats on the supreme court, and that is pretty much all you need to know, and however, one of the republicans is anthony kennedy who has been generally very supportive of gay rights and so many people think that he is going to join the democrats in vetting to overturn doma. >> and neither of us is old enough, but when we are are talking about interracial marriage i would imagine it is similar situation at that time. >> well, you know, the parallels to the case that you are referring to, "loving versus virginia" 1967, and the case that
you think that there is any chance we'll see this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show". we had a little meeting at my house yesterday. travis sent me pictures of you taking your pants off in my driveway. >> i took my pants off in your driveway. >> stephanie: everybody in the neighborhood is like what's going on with that chick? >> i had a speedo on underneath. it wasn't like twigs and berries. >> stephanie: i can make him post it. >> no, i cannot. >> stephanie: i can do it. i'm your boss, ha ha. >> yes i can! >> stephanie: ha ha! >> how is that different from the photo you already have up on facebook? >> i have shorts on there. >> stephanie: oh, well. okay. ity's monday. you know what that means everybody. >> stephanie: good morning rudeness. we've outruded
doing something he hasn't done in almost 30 months. >>> plus, the irs spends your tax money on a star trek themed training video. and bill gates and condoms. the power block is next. oh, hi thehey!ill. are you in town for another meeting? yup, i brought my a-team. business trips add up to family time. this is my family. this is joe. hi joe! hi there! earn a ton of extra points with the double your hhonors promotion and feel the hamptonality. even in stupid loud places. to prove it, we set up our call center right here... [ chirp ] all good? [ chirp ] getty up. call me! seriously, this is really happening! [ cellphone rings ] hello? it's a giant helicopter ma'am. [ male announcer ] get it done [ chirp ] with the ultra-rugged kyocera torque, only from sprint direct connect. buy one get four free for your business. >>> bottom of the hour, i'm brooke baldwin. technology, sports, business, health, science and showbiz news the we're hitting it all for you right now in the power block beginning with this. cbs forced to say sorry for this scene in the amazing race. watch. >> here? oh, there.
in to stem the decline with the absolute dumbest plan i had seen, to tax the depositors, the small-time depositors of a country with hot money, perhaps hot laundered money from russia. that's right. the europeans with the help of the imf reminding you just how stupid of the concept of the euro is, how intendable it is to keep your money in a european bank. the moronic plan gave a super reason to go right back into gold. now before i tell you how i think you're going to get still more fantastic chance to buy the precious metal, let me say i don't want to fall prey to the notion what should happen will happen. i think if i had money in the european bank, i would say to heck with it, i'm going put it in an american bank. who needs this worry. i would typically feel that way if i were wealthy and had the ability to wire the money with a key stroke to let's say jpmorgan where i got my money now. even with the revelations, revelations i should add, brought to light by jpmorgan itself. it's so easy to move your money, i can't believe any wealthy person stays in the european banks. you can
higher prices in some areas. and easing material costs. they also benefited from a lower tax rate, maria, and one of the things folks are watching, their futures, these are pending orders, they're up 6%. the estimate had been for them to be up 5%. they'll have a conference call at about 5:00 eastern. back to you. >> we will be watching. thanks so much, bertha. is now the time to jump back into gold? you just heard jim grant talk about it. the precious metal hitting a high. a lot of money that's in stocks right now will be headed into gold, says dennis gartman. >>> and later, what's happening in washington and how is that affecting farms? tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 when i'm trading, i'm totally focused. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and the streetsmart edge trading platform from charles schwab... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 gives me tools that help me find opportunities more easily. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can even access it from the cloud and trade on any computer. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and with schwab mobile, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can focus on trading anyplace, anytime. tdd#: 1-800-345-25
of the states where it's legal, they can't file joint tax returns or get joint survivor's social security benefits. if the supreme court upholds doma, all of that remains the same. if they overturn it, the federal government will have to treat married people as married people. >> more than half of the country now in support of same-sex marriage. is it that way? does the court line up that way as well? >> this is always a very difficult question. what effect does public opinion have on the justices? the official answer is none. they just apply the constitution. the real-world answer is, plenty. there are five republicans and four democrats on the supreme court. that's pretty much all you need to know. however, one of the republicans is anthony kennedy who has been generally very supportive of gay rights. so many people think he will join the democrats in voting to overturn doma. >> when talking about interracial marriage, i would imagine it was a very similar situation at that time. >> the parallels to the case you're referring to, loving versus virginia, 1967, the case that said states co
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